Tag Archives: internationalization

The New Date and Time API in Java 8

It’s no secret that developers have been unsatisfied with the existing Date and Calendar classes of previous Java versions. I’ve heard complaints that the Calendar API is difficult to understand, lacks needed features, and even causes unexpected concurrency bugs. As a result, developers sometimes migrated to the popular Joda Time library, which apparently satisfied their… Read More »

Unicode Characters and Alternative Glyphs

Unicode defines thousands of characters. Some “characters” are surprising, and others are obvious. When I look at the Unicode standard and consider the lengthy debates that occur when deciding upon whether a character should be included, I can imagine the discussion and rationalization that occurs. Deciding on including a character can be difficult. One of… Read More »

Standard Charsets in Java 7

Once in a while I poke my nose through the release notes of new Java releases. It’s not a particularly rewarding activity, but this time I did find something interesting. Oddly enough, it was interesting for what it did NOT say. I was surprised, so I thought you might want to know about a new… Read More »

Still Can’t Use Apostrophes? Really?

Answer this for me. Why in the world are we still preventing very common characters from name fields in online forms, in bank account applications, in insurance forms…tax returns? Why?  In 2012, many companies have adopted Unicode in their backend databases. But what’s wrong with their development teams that prevent them from allowing customers to… Read More »

Unicode support doesn’t mean your application is internationalized

Over the years, I’ve helped many organizations internationalize their software products. One of the most common misunderstandings is how Unicode will help their product. Customers sometimes mistakenly believe that Unicode support will be sufficient to internationalize their products. Sometimes they believe that Unicode “support” is a single, yes-no, on-off ability, when instead Unicode support is… Read More »