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Determining a visitor’s timezone

July 1st, 2010 joconner No comments

We’ve already decided that determining a timezone for a desktop application is easy. It’s too easy, and so let’s not even waste our time there. Instead, let’s think about something more difficult: how do you determine the timezone of a visitor to your website?

If your site authenticates users, you have most of your problem solved. Along with your user’s preference for username, password, and favorite soccer team (if soccer is your web site’s focus), you can encourage users to register their locale and timezone. This really isn’t so much to ask, not if you are going to offer them rich, useful, or entertaining content.

So ask for a timezone preference! When you ask, however, make sure you ask for something more useful than a simple UTC time offset. Knowing that a visitor is in a UTC-8:00 time zone is helpful but not as helpful as knowing that that same visitor is in the Los Angeles/America time zone. The latter option obviously provides more information about the user. Of course, the Los Angeles/America time zone tells your system that a visitor requires a UTC-8 offset, but it also differentiates this user from someone in Canada that may use the same hour:minute offset. It’s more information! More information usually translates into a better user experience, especially if you take care to utilize that information to customize the experience.

It is also possible to get the browser’s default timezone using a bit of JavaScript. Is this the user’s preference? Maybe, maybe not, but it is available. I’ve heard arguments that suggest that this is not the correct timezone to use. However, my opinion is emphatically this: the timezone of the user’s host pc is probably the best thing you have available in the absence of a specific user preference setting. Yes, people move around; yes, a user can visit your site on the west coast one day and then the east coast the next day without changing the pc setting.

var d = new Date();
var tzOffset = d.getTimezoneOffset();

Is this perfect? No, not at all. In fact, this javascript really just provides a minute value offset from GMT and local time. Still, for formatting a time with a correct timezone offset, this is useful.

If you don’t use a user preference setting in your app or a bit of JavaScript to query your visitor’s host timezone, what else do we have? Hmm…that’s an interesting question. What else is available for determining the timezone of a user visiting your site? Well, they do have an IP address. There are public services and databases that attempt to map this for you, but I just don’t know how accurate this is. I suppose I don’t have any specific reason to doubt its viability; it certainly seems possible at some level. But I’ve not actually spoken with anyone that has used this accurately or successfully. If you have, let me know.

Until next time!

 

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Internationalization Consulting career at EMC?

July 1st, 2010 joconner No comments

Looking for a new position? EMC is looking for an Internationalization Consultant! I can’t take it, but maybe you can.

Summary

The Internationalization Consultant is responsible for participating in planning and discovery sessions, providing consultation on I18N requirements and optimal business/engineering process design, overall status assessments, and contributing to the campaign for education and awareness of I18N standards for product design and development throughout the enterprise.

More Information

For more information, you should check out the EMC job listing directly. Or search their job listings for requisition id #55885BR.

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